Sean Raleigh

Adjunct Professor of Mathematics, Miramar College

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Here are some web sites that you might find helpful.


Pages I've created:

Notation Guide for Precalculus and Calculus Students (PDF file)

    This is a comprehensive guide covering all the major notational errors (and some mathematical ones as well) that are typically found in students' work. Pay special attention to the blue-colored text and the incorrect examples in red-colored text as you will be responsible for avoiding these errors in your work. The PDF file is formatted like a book, so you can print it double-sided and bind it on the left if you wish.

FAQ (Frequently Asked Questions)

    Students often have the same questions from one semester to the next, so here is a collection of answers to such questions.

A Statement on Partial Credit

    The subject of partial credit can be difficult, so I think it's best that my grading philosophy is put forth from the start. Please read this and ask me any questions you might have before it becomes an issue of contention on your tests.

Studying Effectively For Tests

    In this guide I try to explain why we think we study effectively even though we don't. I offer a simple solution for rectifying this problem.


Offsite pages:

Common Math Errors

    This is one of two sites I've listed here that seek to catalogue the types of errors that students make most frequently. Since these are the types of errors that lead to the vast majority of missed points on tests, it would be a good idea to identify and eliminate these errors from your work.

The Most Common Errors in Undergraduate Mathematics

    This is similar to the site above, but slightly more comprehensive and more advanced. Once you have taken Calculus I, you should be familiar with most of the concepts listed here. If you are in a course past Calculus I, you will be held accountable for the types of mistakes illustrated here.

MIT OpenCourseWare

    MIT keeps an online collection of lecture notes, problem sets, old exams, and other study resources for many of their undergraduate courses. (Some courses even have full sets of video lectures you can watch.)

Wikipedia and MathWorld

    These are online encyclopedic resources where you can look up topics in mathematics.
    Wikipedia is a collaborative online encyclopedia project. Its treatment of math topics is very solid, although much of it may be presented in a form that is more advanced than what you need. (Wired magazine ran a fascinating article on the origin and nature of the Wikipedia phenomenon and explains why, despite being a "public" project, its information is surprisingly accurate.)
    MathWorld is obviously about mathematics only and is a site sponsored by Wolfram Research. Its coverage of mathematics is just about as comprehensive as Wikipedia and is sometimes a bit more friendly to non-experts.

The Calculus Page

    A very comprehensive collection of links to calculus resources all over the web.


Last modified: 01/17/08